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Poster: glenn Date: Aug 14, 2004 1:18am
Forum: etree Subject: superscript characters don't work in text files

http://www.archive.org/audio/etree-details-db.php?id=17176
see above for example, in the track listing for downloading tracks there are characters that look like capital A's with numbers by them... in the text file, those are superscript numerals. In future I will be replacing those with something harmless like (2), recommend using no superscripts or other special characters, but can someone point me at a list of 'characters that don't work in text files'?

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Poster: Jonathan Aizen Date: Aug 14, 2004 1:36am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: superscript characters don't work in text files

Superscript characters work fine in text files. See

http://audio13.archive.org/0/audio/sci2002-02-17shnf/sci2002-02-17inforevised.txt

Look at the bottom for the song Breathe.

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Poster: glenn Date: Aug 14, 2004 3:55am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: superscript characters don't work in text files

the superscript looks fine in the text file, yes, but it imports 'funny'... the example you posted doesn't have the individual tracks download section, which is where the 'funny characters' end up.
(http://www.archive.org/audio/etree-details-db.php?id=782)

look at my example, under 'file downloads':
(http://www.archive.org/audio/etree-details-db.php?id=17176)
MLT¹ <---THAT CHARACTER IS how "A "SUPERSCRIPT 1" is imported from the text file.

14.3M 7.0M 89.2M 21.7M
Drums¹ 5.4M 2.7M 34.2M 8.1M
MLT¹ 1.9M 923.7K 10.7M 3.0M
Revolution¹

maybe this is fixable at the other end?

maybe I should continue to replace superscript characters with something that doesn't import fuuny? Comments?

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Poster: xtifr Date: Aug 14, 2004 6:06am
Forum: etree Subject: characters that *will* work in text files

Google for "ascii chart" (and go ahead and click on "I'm Feeling Lucky") to get a list of characters that are guaranteed to work pretty much everywhere. Anything beyond the 96 printable characters on that chart is probably going to cause problems for someone, somewhere.

The main problem (I suspect) is that the world is in the middle of a transition from older, US-centric encodings like latin1 (iso8859-1) to Unicode. Older text files mostly use latin1; newer ones, like yours, Unicode. Unfortunately, it's not easy for a computer to tell the difference, so programs have to guess, and, in this case, seem to have guessed wrong.

And if that explanation doesn't clear things up for you, then I recommend sticking with ascii. :)

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Poster: glenn Date: Aug 14, 2004 7:48am
Forum: etree Subject: Re: characters that *will* work in text files

thanks.